A Hornby Southern Railway E220 Special Tank

WINDSOR

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BACKGROUND

THE LAYOUT

The station uses a late Hornby No. 2E ‘Windsor’ station of c.1935 and a number of Island Platforms (not electrically lit) and ‘Passenger Platforms’ (i.e., extension platforms).  All the platform surfaces are in the green finish Hornby used 1933-36.   These are arranged to create four through tracks on what is essentially a two-track layout.  The stock is a mixture of vintage and modern makes representing the Southern Railway of the same mid-1930s period, optionally with some GWR interest too.


REQUIREMENTS

In real life, Windsor was served by the Great Western and the Southern Railways.  However, it was presumably not so much its railways but its royal - and, therefore, patriotic - associations that led it being used as the name for the first Hornby stations in 1923.  Indeed, Meccano did not add GWR finishes to its range until 1926, and Southern liveries did not arrive until 1928.  

In the world of Hornby, though, it did not seem to matter that the LMS and LNER had developed otherwise unknown branches into Royal Berkshire - no matter which of the ‘Big Four’ companies the Hornby Boy might favour, ‘Windsor’ was the only name offered as a station, and so it would remain until 1936, when Meccano finally bowed to geography, and ‘Windsor’ was retired in favour of four new names.

This layout would occupy approximately 10’ x 20’.  Alternatively, a smaller version with only three through platforms could be fitted into 8’ x 20’.

As with ‘Wembley’ and ‘Reading’, this can also be done as a smaller double-track layout.   The minimum area required for a sensible layout would be approximately 6’ x 8’ - but more would be better, especially length-wise.